Cultural Violence by Johan Galtung (1990)

This article introduces a concept of ‘cultural violence’, and can be seen as a follow-up of the author’s introduction of the concept of ‘structural violence’ over 20 years ago (Galtung. 1969). Cultural violence is defined here as any aspect of a culture that can be used to legitimize violence in its direct or structural form. Symbolic violence built into a culture does not kill or maim like direct violence or the violence built into the structure. However, it is used to legitimize either or both, as for instance in the theory of a Herrenvolk, or a superior race. The relations between direct, structural and cultural violence are explored, using a violence triangle and a violence strata image, with various types of casual flows. Examples of cultural violence are indicated, using a division of culture into religion and ideology, art and language, and empirical and formal science. The theory of cultural violence is then related to two basic points in Gandhism, the doctrines of unity of life and of unity of means and ends. Finally, the inclusion of culture as a major focus of peace research is seen not only as deepening the quest for peace, but also as a possible contribution to the as yet non-existent general discipline of ‘culturology’. Read More

Regenerative Development: The Art and Science of Creating Durably Vibrant Human Networks by Dr Sally Goerner

Reproduced from: http://capitalinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/000-Regenerative-Devel-Final-Goerner-Sept-1-2015.pdf Regenerative  Development: The Art and Science of Creating Durably Vibrant Human Networks  Dr. Sally Goerner We are searching for a path that will lead us beyond our current unsustainable economic system. John Fullerton, Capital Institute Regeneration refers to the self-feeding, self-renewing processes that natural systems use to nourish their capacity to thrive for… Read More

Shifting from Central Planning to a Decentralised Economy: Do we Need Central Banks? – Professor Werner

 Reblogged from: https://professorwerner.org/shifting-from-central-planning-to-a-decentralised-economy-do-we-need-central-banks/ Shifting from Central Planning to a Decentralised Economy: Do we Need Central Banks? by Professor Richard A. Werner, D.Phil. (Oxon) Paper presented at the 14th Rhodes Forum: Dialogue of Civilisations Research Institute, Panel 2: Economic Alternatives when Conventional Models Fail Rhodos, Greece on 1 October 2016 I. The Central Bank Narrative For more than… Read More

Towards a New Democracy and a New Independence – A Program for the Second Independence Revolution Paper Presented By Tennyson S.D. Joseph

Reproduced from: http://www.normangirvan.info/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/tennyson-joseph-tobago-paper.pdf Towards a New Democracy and a New Independence A Program for the Second Independence Revolution Paper Presented By Tennyson S.D. Joseph* To A “Common Sense Convois” Organized by Lloyd Best Institute of the West Indies The Magdalena Resort Hotel Scarborough Tobago, Trinidad and Tobago Saturday March 24th, 2012 *Lecturer in Political Science,… Read More

Human Rights versus Corporate Rights: Life Value, the Civil Commons and Social Justice by JOHN MCMURTRY

This analysis maps the deepening global crisis and the principles of its resolution by life-value analysis and method. Received theories of economics and justice and modern rights doctrines are shown to have no ground in life value and to be incapable of recognizing universal life goods and the rising threats to them. In response to this system failure at theoretical and operational levels, the unifying nature and measure of life value are defined to provide the long-missing basis for understanding the common interest, human rights and social justice—that is, the universal life necessities of humanity across cultures and the evolving civil commons infrastructures to ensure them. In contrast, the treaty-imposed corporate rights system miscalled “globalization” is structured to predate life means and support systems at all levels with no accountability beyond itself. Only the logic of life value, human rights and life-protective law, it is concluded, can comprehend or govern this inherently life-blind and cumulatively eco-genocidal regime. Read More