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Category: Physics

Are there alternatives to our present theories of physical reality? by Peter Rowlands

Our notions of what is physically ‘real’ have long been based on the idea that the real is what is immediately apprehended, that is the local or observable, the physically tangible, though there has always been an alternative philosophical notion that the ‘real’ is some kind of ontological structure beyond immediate apprehension, and so inaccessible through physics. However, quantum mechanics, with its intrinsic nonlocal correlations, has seemingly left us with a dilemma by showing that fundamental physical theories cannot be both real and local. Reality cannot be reconstructed as a deterministic projection from physical observations. Many people think that the problem lies with quantum mechanics, but, in fact, it is more likely to be a result of unrealistic expectations. We have assumed that fundamental physics ought to be compatible with normal (macroscopic) experience. If, however, we go beyond our current high-level physical theories to the basic elements from which they are constructed, we see that a pattern emerges that gives us a very different and much more coherent understanding of what is meant by physical ‘reality’.

Watch “Good-Bye to Matter” by Ervin Laszlo on YouTube

Reproduced from: http://www.itcprague2017.org/speakers/ervin-laszlo Good-Bye to Matter The history of Western thought is largely the history of materialism. With few exceptions, mainly confined to idealist philosophers and a handful of phyicists, the […]

A SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO AUTOPOIESIS – CYBERNETICS FORURM (1981)

Reproduced from: http://www.univie.ac.at/aoc/asc/Periodica/X_2_3_1981.pdf IN THIS ISSUE: Foreword by the Special-Issues Editor, Klaus Krippendorff Autopoiesis Today, Milan Zeleny Autopoiesis: The Organization of Living Systems, Its Characterization and a Model, F.G. Varela, H.R. […]

“Syntactical and Semantic Information Systems” by Reginald T. Cahill

The ongoing failure of physics to fully match all the aspects of the phenomena of time, apart from that of order, arises because physics has always used non-process models, as is the nature of formal or syntactical systems. Such systems do not require any notion of process - they are entirely structural and static. The new process physics overcomes these deficiencies by using a non-geometric process model for time, but process physics also argues for the importance of relational or semantic information in modelling reality. Semantic information refers to the notion that reality is a purely informational system where the information is internally meaningful. Hence the information is ‘content addressable’, rather than is the case in the usual syntactical information modelling where the information is represented by symbols. This symbolic or syntactical mode is only applicable to higher level phenomenological descriptions, and for that reason was discovered first.