Martin Luther King Jr – A Christmas Sermon on Peace – 1967

Reproduced from here (currently removed): http://www.ecoflourish.com/Primers/education/Christmas_Sermon.html Can also be found here: https://www.priory.org/file/junior-school-newsletter/A-Christmas-Sermon-on-Peace.pdf Audio can be found here: http://www.cbc.ca/radio/rewind/martin-luther-king-jr-s-christmas-message-of-peace-1.2801282 Martin Luther King A Christmas Sermon on Peace 1967 Dr. King first delivered this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, where he served as co-pastor. On Christmas Eve, 1967, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation aired this sermon as part of the seventh… Read More

Reclaiming our for-ever-giving and forgiving human nature and bringing us back from the brink of the for-ever-taking and fortaking misgivings of war

The drum beats of World War Three are on the horizon, and I sense we are collectively on a suicidal path.  We have in our arsenal of human engagement weapons of mass destruction that have the potential to actualise the permanent destruction of lives, communities and even all of humanity, including the integrity of the… Read More

Keeping it real – from the rule of law to the rule of life

1“Do not judge, or you too will be judged. 2For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. 3“Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your… Read More

Cultural Violence by Johan Galtung (1990)

© Journal of Peace Research. vol. 27. no. 3. 1990. pp. 291-305

Cultural Violence*

JOHAN GALTUNG

College of Social Sciences, University of Hawaii, Manoa

This article introduces a concept of ‘cultural violence’, and can be seen as a follow-up of the author’s introduction of the concept of ‘structural violence’ over 20 years ago (Galtung. 1969). Cultural violence is defined here as any aspect of a culture that can be used to legitimize violence in its direct or structural form. Symbolic violence built into a culture does not kill or maim like direct violence or the violence built into the structure. However, it is used to legitimize either or both, as for instance in the theory of a Herrenvolk, or a superior race. The relations between direct, structural and cultural violence are explored, using a violence triangle and a violence strata image, with various types of casual flows. Examples of cultural violence are indicated, using a division of culture into religion and ideology, art and language, and empirical and formal science. The theory of cultural violence is then related to two basic points in Gandhism, the doctrines of unity of life and of unity of means and ends. Finally, the inclusion of culture as a major focus of peace research is seen not only as deepening the quest for peace, but also as a possible contribution to the as yet non-existent general discipline of ‘culturology’.

*Presented as a lecture at the University of Melbourne Peace Studies Group, March 1989; at the summer Schools in Peace Studies at the University of Oslo and the University of Hawaii, July 1989; and at the Inter­national Peace Research Institute, Oslo, August 1989. I am indebted to discussants at all these places.

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